ABOUT

 

Rotary Peace Fellows are leaders promoting national and international cooperation, peace, and the successful resolution of conflict throughout their lives, in their careers, and through service activities. Fellows earn a master’s degree in international relations, sustainable development, peace studies, conflict resolution, or a professional development certificate in peace and conflict studies. The Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center is one of six Rotary Peace Center Partner Universities worldwide. Fellows selected to study at the Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center will enroll either at Duke’s Master’s Program in International Development Policy (MIDP), or in UNC master’s programs under various relevant departments and schools (for details see the Academics page).

The joint Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center takes advantage of the best faculty, courses, resources and technology that each university offers. All of our Fellows have access to these resources on both campuses. Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are located within 10 miles of one another, and both border the Research Triangle Park, home to internationally renowned research facilities and corporations. The area has been ranked as one of the best places in America for living, working and for education by a number of national publications.

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THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL

Established in 1793, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was the first public university in the United States. It figures prominently in assessments and rankings centered on national academic leadership within research funding, excellence of programs, affordability and diversity. Here are some highlights:

• Ranked 1st among the 100 best U.S. public colleges and universities that offer the best combination of top-flight academics and affordable costs as ranked by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine for 13 consecutive years.

• Ranked 5th best public university and #29 among all American universities by U.S. News & World Report (2011 edition).

• Ranked 42nd among 500 universities included in the 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities, an annual list produced and posted online by Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

• Ranked 43rd among the world’s top 400 universities in 2011-2012, according to the London-based Times Higher Education magazine.

 

 

The Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center in the U.S. selects Rotary Peace Fellows based on their ability to have a significant, positive impact on world peace and conflict
resolution during their future careers. The ideal candidate has at least three years of work experience with an excellent undergraduate academic record with a four-year degree.

At the University of North Carolina, Rotary Peace Fellows study in the department or school to which they are admitted. Fellows have received master’s degrees from the following departments in recent years:

Rotary Peace Fellows at UNC have the opportunity to take courses outside of their department at both universities in addition to completing departmental requirements. The UNC website provides detailed information on each department of the university, its requirements, faculty, and course offerings.

DUKE UNIVERSITY

Duke University is a major center for learning and research, and has consistently ranked among the top 10 colleges and universities in the United States in recent years.

• Ranked 10th best university among all American universities by U.S. News & World Report (2011 edition).

• Ranked 35th among 500 universities included in the 2011 Academic Ranking of World Universities, an annual list produced and posted online by Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

• Ranked 22nd among the world’s top 400 universities in 2011-2012, according to the London-based Times Higher Education magazine.

The Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center in the U.S. selects Rotary Peace Fellows based on their ability to have a significant, positive impact on world peace and conflict resolution during their future careers. The ideal candidate for Duke’s Master of International Development Policy (MIDP) program has at least five years of work experience with an excellent undergraduate academic record with a four-year degree. Previous quantitative coursework is important.
Rotary Peace Fellows accepted at Duke University will study for the Master of International Development Policy (MIDP) at the Duke Center for International Development (DCID). MIDP is a unique interdisciplinary program dedicated to the training of mid-career professionals who plan to dedicate their careers to policy-making and public service in and for developing and transition countries. The mission of the program is to provide top-quality, personalized education in international development policy and to make contributions to international social, political and economic development.

MIDP is a small environment with fewer than 50 students accepted each year, coming from all over the world. In addition to required MIDP seminars, students may take courses in other graduate departments at Duke University as well as at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Students design their course of study with the assistance of their faculty advisor.

MIDP employs faculty whose teaching, research, and consulting experience encompass a broad range of issues, including sustainable economic development, public finance, nongovernmental organizations, development management, community-based development, international trade, and environmental and social policy.

For a complete description of the MIDP program as well as admissions requirements, the curriculum and course descriptions, please review the MIDP website.

 

 

The Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center

The Duke-UNC Rotary Peace Center is jointly managed by the Duke Center for International Development (DCID) and UNC’s Center for Global Initiatives.  The Center maintains an office on each campus, in order to serve our students and faculty at both locations.  In addition to providing academic and cultural support to the fellows, the Center organizes additional seminars and events throughout the academic year.

The Center is served by two Faculty Directors, who represent each campus:

• From Duke: Catherine Admay, Visiting Professor of Public Policy Studies

• From UNC: Peggy Bentley, Associate Dean for Global Health and Associate Director, Institute for Global Health & Infectious Disease at UNC

The daily management of the Center is handled by Managing Director Susan Carroll and Program Coordinator Amy Cole.